Free Shipping over $100 

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

March 15, 2020

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor) is native to Europe, Asia and North America. Turkey Tails have long been used to support immune health, in Traditional Chinese Medicine as well as Native American herbalism.* Turkey Tail grows naturally in many types of forests, although it is primarily found throughout mixed hardwood deciduous forests. This mushroom is abundant and edible, but it’s not particularly delicious or palatable. (They can be quite tough.) It is often found growing in clusters on fallen branches and logs throughout the forest floor. A mushroom goes through many stages during its life cycle, just like any plant or animal. Each part of a mushroom has unique attributes that support wellness and serve a different purpose for the organism, but it’s the fruiting bodies that receive the most attention and are the most familiar. Fruiting bodies emerge from the substrate on which they grow — such as trees or fallen logs — to become the part of the mushroom we recognize. They’re the above-ground part that we can see when we walk through the woods, and they’re also what have been traditionally foraged and consumed, in food and supplements.

TRADITIONAL HEALTH BENEFITS OF TURKEY TAILS

Immune Support, Liver & Cleanse Support

WHAT IS TURKEY TAILS USED FOR?

The fruiting bodies of this mushroom contain polysaccharides, specifically a type called beta-glucans, which have been studied to support immune health and overall wellness, as well as normal, healthy cell growth and turnover.* The fruiting body extracts we use contain these polysaccharides, without unnecessary fillers or starches. Turkey Tails are the most widely researched mushroom, and numerous strains have been investigated, analyzed and chosen for their production of beta-glucans. They help support a healthy inflammatory response as well as normal cell growth and turnover; Turkey Tails also support immune health and the liver.

https://www.combat-nutrition.com/collections/frontpage/products/bio-hackers-set

 

Active Constituents of Turkey Tails

Beta (1>3),(1>6)-glucans; protein-bound polysaccharides. polysaccharide peptide (PSP) and polysaccharide krestin (PSK)

Parts Used

Fruiting body

Additional Resources

1.) Yeung JH and Or PM. Polysaccharide peptides from Coriolus versicolor competitively inhibit tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation in specific human CYP2C9 isoform and pooled human liver microsomes. Phytomedicine 2011;18(13):1170-5. 2.) Arora, David. Mushrooms Demystified. Ten Speed Press, NY. 1986. 3.) Ng TB. A review of research on the protein-bound polysaccharide (polysaccharopeptide, PSP) from the mushroom Coriolus versicolor (Basidiomycetes: Polyporaceae). Gen Pharmacol 1998;30:1-4. 4.) Barros AB, Ferrão J, Fernandes T. A safety assessment of Coriolus versicolor biomass as a food supplement. Food Nutr Res 2016;60:29953.

Important Precautions

Not for use in during pregnancy or lactation. If you have a medical condition or take pharmaceutical drugs please consult your doctor prior to use.

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner.




Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Herbs & Botanicals (not intended as medical advice)

Black pepper (Piper nigrum)
Black pepper (Piper nigrum)

March 16, 2020

The dried fruit of Black Pepper (Piper nigrum) has long been used as a culinary spice and as a traditional medicine, and today it is ubiquitous in most cuisines. Black Pepper is made from the plant’s unripened green drupes (stone fruit), which are called “peppercorns.” They are briefly boiled and dried or cooked. Native to southern and southeast Asia, Black Pepper’s use in Indian cooking dates to the first century BC, and it became popular across Europe during the Roman Empire. In ancient Greece, it was so valued that it was used as currency. The active constituent called Piperine is what gives Black Pepper its pungency.

Continue Reading

black elderberry (Sambucus nigra)
black elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

March 16, 2020

Primarily found in Europe and North America, Black Elderberries have long been used in traditional cultures to support immune function. Elderberry has an extensive history of being used during seasonal immune challenges. Regarded as an “Elder” plant in Native American Herbalism, Elderberry has been used collectively by many tribes as a tonic medicine and food to promote health and vitality. Elderberries have also been used as a food source for making wine, and syrup.

Continue Reading

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia)
Bitter melon (Momordica charantia)

March 16, 2020

Bitter Melon is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family (cucumbers, pumpkins and watermelons), and is a perennial climbing elongated fruit that resembles a gourd or cucumber. Some have called it "bitter gourd" or "bitter cucumber". In specialty Asian markets, it may be known as "karela". Bitter Melon is primarily cultivated in the tropics, especially China, India, East African, Central, South America and the Caribbean.

Continue Reading