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Aloe vera (aloe barbadensis)

March 16, 2020

Aloe vera (aloe barbadensis)

Aloe is one of the most commonly used health plants of all time. The genus is native to Africa, and is very common in South Africa’s Cape Province. Aloe has been widely cultivated throughout the world and especially in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, in the United States. Although Aloe Vera is a tropical plant, the root can survive freezing air temperatures, so long as the ground is not frozen and the root destroyed. One of the first recorded accounts in our understanding of Aloe can be found in the Greek Herbal of Dioscorides (41 A.D.-68 A.D.). This master of Roman pharmacology developed his knowledge and skill as he traveled with that great empire's armies.

TRADITIONAL HEALTH BENEFITS OF ALOE

Digestive Support, Immune Support

WHAT IS ALOE USED FOR?

As is the case with many health plants, the function depends on the form in which the plant is delivered. Aloe vera products are made from the juice, the gel, and the whole leaf, and come in tablets, capsules, juices, gels, topical ointments, and lotions. Aloe gel and juice are considered demulcent, and have soothing properties for the skin. A group of plant chemicals called Polysaccharides is also present in Aloe although only found in preparations using the Whole Leaf, since these immune supporting chemicals are not found in the inner gel or juice, but in the "skin" or outer parts of the plant. In summary, Aloe support the body's natural elimination processes, and soothes the intestinal tract, mucous membranes and skin.

 

Active Constituents of Aloe

amino acids, anthraquinones, enzymes, minerals, vitamins, lignans, polysaccharides, salicylic acid, saponins, and sterols

Parts Used

Juice, gel, leaves

Additional Resources

Nurten Ozsoy, Eda Candoken, Nuriye Akev; Antioxidative activity, total phenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, β-carotene and β-tocopherol in Aloe vera. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2009 Apr-Jun; 2(2): 99-106. Soyun Cho, Serah Lee, Min-Jung Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Chong-Hyun Won, Sang Min Kim, Jin Ho Chung; Ann Dermatol. 2009 February; 21(1): 6-11. Thomas E Merchant, Christina Bosley, Julie Smith, Pam Baratti, David Pritchard, Tina Davis, Chenghong Li, Xiaoping Xiong Radiat Oncol. 2007; 2: 45.

Important Precautions

Not for use during pregnancy or lactation. If you have a medical condition or take pharmaceutical drugs please consult your doctor prior to use.

Disclaimer

This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner




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