Free Shipping over $100 

SEA SALT

SEA SALT

Continue Reading

Himalayan Salt

Himalayan Salt

Continue Reading

Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis)

Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis)

Continue Reading


Black pepper (Piper nigrum)

Black pepper (Piper nigrum)

The dried fruit of Black Pepper (Piper nigrum) has long been used as a culinary spice and as a traditional medicine, and today it is ubiquitous in most cuisines. Black Pepper is made from the plant’s unripened green drupes (stone fruit), which are called “peppercorns.” They are briefly boiled and dried or cooked. Native to southern and southeast Asia, Black Pepper’s use in Indian cooking dates to the first century BC, and it became popular across Europe during the Roman Empire. In ancient Greece, it was so valued that it was used as currency. The active constituent called Piperine is what gives Black Pepper its pungency.

Continue Reading

black elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

black elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

Primarily found in Europe and North America, Black Elderberries have long been used in traditional cultures to support immune function. Elderberry has an extensive history of being used during seasonal immune challenges. Regarded as an “Elder” plant in Native American Herbalism, Elderberry has been used collectively by many tribes as a tonic medicine and food to promote health and vitality. Elderberries have also been used as a food source for making wine, and syrup.

Continue Reading

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia)

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia)

Bitter Melon is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family (cucumbers, pumpkins and watermelons), and is a perennial climbing elongated fruit that resembles a gourd or cucumber. Some have called it "bitter gourd" or "bitter cucumber". In specialty Asian markets, it may be known as "karela". Bitter Melon is primarily cultivated in the tropics, especially China, India, East African, Central, South America and the Caribbean.

Continue Reading


Beet root (Beta vulgaris)

Beet root (Beta vulgaris)

The common garden Beet is a plant we all know and some of us love for the deep red tuber greens that taste similar to spinach. The cultivation of Beets dates all the way back to the 8th century B.C. in the Mediterranean and has hybridized for different growth characteristics. Different kinds of Chard are related to Beets, grown for their leaves as well as the Sugar Beet, which began being cultivated commercially in Germany in the 18th century when it was discovered that it had a very high sucrose content and was a great source for table sugar. All the various cultures that have ever cultivated Beets prized them for their nutritive and medicinal properties. In Eastern Europe, Beet Soup known as borscht is very common.

Continue Reading

Bayberry (Myrica cerifera)

Bayberry (Myrica cerifera)

This evergreen shrub is found in various habitats ranging from New England to Delaware and Maryland in the United States. However, the plant can be successfully cultivated as far north as southern Connecticut and Long Island on the U.S. east coast. It also grows in Bermuda and the Caribbean. Its waxy fruits are a source of food for many birds including Wild Turkey, Quail, Wren and Tree Sparrow whose digestive systems remove that waxy coating and prepare the seeds for successful germination.

Continue Reading

Bacopa (Bacopa monnieri)

Bacopa (Bacopa monnieri)

Bacopa (Bacopa monnieri), is a perennial herb that has been recently reclassified into the Plantaginaceae family from the Scrophulariaceae or Figwort family. Bacopa is a small, creeping succulent and water loving herb, which grows in ponds, tidal lands, and wetlands in tropical and semitropical areas.

Continue Reading


Asian ginseng (panax ginseng)

Asian ginseng (panax ginseng)

Asian Ginseng is one of the most economically, and historically important plants. It has been used for thousands of years and appears in the first known Chinese Materia Medica (thought to have been written during the Han Dynasty, 220 BCE). Ginseng root is native to the northern mountainous regions of Korea, China, and parts of the Russian Federation. Cultivation of Panax ginseng in Korea started around 11 B.C. by transplantation of wild ginseng.

Continue Reading

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

This plant is a member of the Solanaceae family and has over 4,000 years of traditional use in its native India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. It is a Medharasayan which is the Ayurvedic category of foods and nutrients that promote learning and memory retrieval. It is sometimes referred to as “Indian Ginseng” as it is traditionally used in conditions of debility, emaciation, impotence and premature aging. It is also sometimes referred to as Winter Cherry. The translation of Ashwagandha is roughly, “the smell and strength of a horse”, alluding to its aphrodisiac properties. This plant is a Tonic and an Adaptogen. In the Middle East it is used to help promote normal sleep patterns and encourage a healthy inflammatory response.

Continue Reading

Artichoke (Cynara Scolymus)

Artichoke (Cynara Scolymus)

The Artichoke plant is a type of thistle, related to Silybum marianum (Milk Thistle) and is thought to be native to Northern Africa but has been naturalized over most of Europe and parts of North America. It is well known as a culinary delicacy, popularized by French and Italian aristocracy. There is a Greek myth that the first Artichoke was a woman of surpassing beauty named Cynara, who lived on the island of Zinari. Zeus, who was there visiting Poseidon, fell in love with her and decided to make her a goddess. Cynara missed her home and mother so much that she would sneak back to earth from Mount Olympus to visit. This infuriated Zeus, who returned her back to earth transforming her into the first Artichoke.

Continue Reading


star anise (pimpinella anisum)

star anise (pimpinella anisum)

This flowering plant is native to the Mediterranean region and Southwest Asia. It is in the Apiaceae family of plants and related to the Carrot and Parsley plants. The seeds have a very sweet and aromatic flavor and have been used in numerous culinary and confection products including Black Jelly Beans, and Italian Pizzelle cookies. Ancient Romans used to serve a cake at the end of a large meal as a digestive enhancer. Some say the tradition of serving cake at a festivity came from this ancient Roman tradition.

Continue Reading

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius)

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius)

American Ginseng is deeply rooted in the North American Herbal tradition and has been a famous herb of commerce especially in trade with China for over 200 years. A member of the araliaceae (Ivy) family, and in the same genus as Asian/Korean Ginseng (Panax ginseng), these two plants are closely related in use. American Ginseng is considered much less stimulating and more “cooling”. 

Continue Reading

Aloe vera (aloe barbadensis)

Aloe vera (aloe barbadensis)

Aloe is one of the most commonly used health plants of all time. The genus is native to Africa, and is very common in South Africa’s Cape Province. Aloe has been widely cultivated throughout the world and especially in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, in the United States. Although Aloe Vera is a tropical plant, the root can survive freezing air temperatures, so long as the ground is not frozen and the root destroyed. One of the first recorded accounts in our understanding of Aloe can be found in the Greek Herbal of Dioscorides (41 A.D.-68 A.D.)

Continue Reading


Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

This plant is probably better known as an agricultural product for livestock or cover cropping, but in recent years its high nutritional value has brought some attention to its use for humans. Many people eat the sprouted seed of Alfalfa, but the green flowering plant is mostly dried and used as hay for livestock and can be found in tablet form for supplementation. Alfalfa has roots that reach hundreds of feet into the ground and has one of the highest mineral profiles of any land plant.

Continue Reading

Hemp (cannabis sativa)

Hemp (cannabis sativa)

The Hemp plant is a quite famous plant in the Cannabaceae family with a very rich history in human culture. Hemp has been employed to make cloth, paper, and food since the first Neolithic human societies began in Central and Southeast Asia. Cannabis sativa has also been used as a sacred religious plant in Buddhist, Hindu, Hebrew, African, and Caribbean cultures. Its medical use dates back to 5,000 years ago, when Chinese physicians prescribed Cannabis for fatigue, malaria, and rheumatism. The American Eclectic physicians of the early 1900s preferred Cannabis extract to support healthy urinary tract function, and to support healthy digestion, mood, and sleep.

Continue Reading

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor) is native to Europe, Asia and North America. Turkey Tails have long been used to support immune health, in Traditional Chinese Medicine as well as Native American herbalism.* Turkey Tail grows naturally in many types of forests, although it is primarily found throughout mixed hardwood deciduous forests. This mushroom is abundant and edible, but it’s not particularly delicious or palatable. (They can be quite tough.) It is often found growing in clusters on fallen branches and logs throughout the forest floor.

Continue Reading


Shiitake (Lentinus edodes)

Shiitake (Lentinus edodes)

Shiitake (Lentinus edodes) is native to Asia with a rich history of use in the kitchen and in herbalism. In the 12th century, Shiitake Mushroom cultivation began in the mountains of central China. A fragrant and delicious edible mushroom, Shiitake is now the second most popular cultivated Mushroom in the world. While Shiitake are cultivated around the world, its natural habitat is hardwood forests throughout Asia. In nature, Shiitake spores are released from fruiting bodies in the fall or spring, traveling through the forest air and landing on both live tree branches and fallen limbs and logs. Healthy trees will overcome the Shiitake spores and live on, while the Shiitake spores will take over the dead branch and build a mycelial network that produces fruiting bodies. 

Continue Reading

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus)

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus)

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus) is also known as Cinder Conk or Black Mass, which accurately describe its appearance. This mushroom, which feeds on birch trees, is native to the forests of Europe, Russia, North America and cold northern climates in general, where birch is the primary tree species. For hundreds of years, Chaga has been wild-crafted and utilized by the people of northern Europe and Russia, often consumed as a tea.

Continue Reading

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum)

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum)

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum) has been called the mushroom of immortality; in Chinese this mushroom is known as Ling Zhi. Native to Europe, Asia and North America, Reishi has been revered in China for thousands of years. It is depicted in many Chinese works of art and is utilized in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Reishi can be found in varying climates throughout the world, preferring tropical, sub-tropical and temperate climates where deciduous hardwood trees are abundant. Despite its adaptability to different climates and topography, Reishi remains elusive. 

Continue Reading


Cordyceps (Cordyceps militaris)

Cordyceps (Cordyceps militaris)

The parasite fungus 
Cordycepts are known as adaptogens, adaptogens are used to promote homeostasis in the body (bringing levels back to normal). 

Cordyceps are a parasitic fungus. Meaning, mushroom spores attach themselves to insects and arthripod’s, feeding, growing, controlling the insects nervous system to move up into high altitudes and  die in an environment that’s more favourable for the mushrooms reproduction.

Continue Reading

Lions mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus)

Lions mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus)

Lions mane mushrooms are large white fluffy mushrooms that partially resemble a lions mane as they grow. They are used In cooking and also as a medicine in countries such as China India and Japan.
Lions mane can be eaten raw, cooked, or steeped in a tea. The extract is a popular health supplement that has shown to benefit the gut, brain and heart.

Continue Reading

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

Lemon balm is one of the oldest known healing plants. It’s botanical name, Melissa, comes from the Greek word for ‘honey bee’ because the plant is so attractive to bees. Lemon balm is used for its soothing and antispasmodic properties.

lemon balm is a perennial that belongs to the Labiateae family. The entire plant has a strong lemon aroma especially when crushed and can grow to around 60cm tall. 

Continue Reading


Wild Strawberry (fragaria vesca)

Wild Strawberry (fragaria vesca)

The root of the strawberry was once a popular remedy for diarrhoea and the stalks were used for wound care. The fruit was used in typhoid epidemics and the leaves were used for gout. 

The wild strawberry belongs to the rosacea family and grows to about 20cm tall.

Continue Reading

Lavender (lavandula angustifolia)

Lavender (lavandula angustifolia)

Lavender is known for its calming affects and is often referred to as the nerve herb. the name lavender is derived from the Latin word Lavare, meaning ‘to wash’. in Roman times lavenders distinctive aroma made it a popular herb to bath in. Today it is commonly used in perfumery and aromatherapy, and to make lavender sachets.

Continue Reading

Bilberry (vaccinium myrtillus)

Bilberry (vaccinium myrtillus)

Bilberries or Huckleberrys are sweet tasting wild fruits. being rich and tannins make them a good treatment for diarrhoea and mucus membranes. Bilbery is a low shrub only growing 20 to 50 cm tall.  The pale flowers develop into bluish black berries with a sweet and tangy taste while the leaves have a bitter taste.

Continue Reading


Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus)

Ginseng is one of the most commonly used herbal remedies for maintaining good health rather than treating illness. it is used as an adaptagen as well as increasing performance and endurance. Siberian ginseng grows 2 to 3 m tall where the branches are covered with woody spikes.

Continue Reading

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita)

Chamomile (Matricaria recutita)

Chamomile is probably one of the most well known healing herbs used in traditional medicine. The word Matricaria derives from the Latin word womb and chamomile was originally used to treat gynaecological issues. The two types of chamomile used are Roman camomile and German or wild chamomile.

Chamomile is an annual plant and can grow up to around 80cm tall. It has bright green hairy leaves with a mix of small white and yellow flowers. Chamomile originally grew in South Eastern Europe and today is found all over the world where it is often referred to as 'the plant doctor.'

Continue Reading

Hops (Humulus Lupulus)

Hops (Humulus Lupulus)

Hops has been used since the middle ages to flavour beer. It has also been used for its healing properties for weak digestion, poor appetites as well as its calming and sleep inducing properties. Hops belongs to the hemp family and has recently been found to contain a full spectrum of cannabinoids. Hops can grow to roughly 6m tall, the females grow tight budding flowers whereas the males grow loose panicles. Hops has a strong herbal smell and bitter taste.

Continue Reading


Dill (Anethum graveolens)

Dill (Anethum graveolens)

Dill is a culinary herb known for its calming and healing effects. The oldest known record of dill is in an ancient Egyptian papyrus where it is recommended for headaches. Dill was believed to ward off evil spirits when sprinkled over newborn babies. Dill grows to approximately 1m tall with feathery leaves and yellow flowers with a strong herbal smell and bitter taste.

Dill is native to Central and South Asia yet today grows all over the world. Both fresh and dried parts of the plant are used in cooking and for medicinal purposes.

The active constituents found in dill are used in traditional digestive and calming remedies which include;

Continue Reading

Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum)

Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum)

The fruit of this herb is also known as St Mary's milk and is commonly used for its protective effects on the liver. Legend has it Mary's milk was spilled when breastfeeding baby Jesus and St Mary's milk thistle grew where the milk had spilt with its milk stained leaves. 

Milk thistle is used in supportive treatments for inflammatory inflammatory liver conditions and liver cirrhosis. It can also be taken as a mild laxative and for gallbladder problems. Milk thistle is most frequently used to protect the liver and in some cases to help treat varicose veins. Milk thistle is most commonly taken as a tea, tincture or as herbal capsules.

Continue Reading